Delivering on the Promise of Multicloud Lambda-like Functionality

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In February, we launch a beta called Project Kratos. It promised to bring Lambda-like functionality to any cloud – public, private, hybrid or on-premises. As we quickly approach Q4, February seems like a long time ago, but so much has happened since then.

Over the past seven months, serverless computing has gained momentum as more than just the hot topic of the moment. Because it allows enterprises to build and deploy applications and services at scale on flexible platforms that abstract away physical infrastructure, it’s quickly becoming a must have for the modern enterprise. It will soon be a competitive advantage for those already implementing it.

Our journey with serverless has also moved from a project announcement full of promises to the solution that is widely available today.  First, in April, we announced the general availability of its multicloud solution. Since then, we’ve systematically partnered with leading cloud providers to support multicloud development.

In April, Iron.io announced its partnership with Mirantis to bring event-driven, serverless functionality to the OpenStack community. The joint solution enables enterprise developers using OpenStack to deliver applications and services faster through the serverless experience provided by Iron.io.

In May, Iron.io announced its collaboration with Cloud Foundry Foundation, home of the industry-standard multi-cloud platform, to integrate the Iron.io API with the Cloud Foundry platform.

In June, Iron.io brought the serverless experience to Red Hat OpenShift — a pairing that provided users with an end-to-end environment for building and deploying applications at scale, without the headaches of complex operations.

And in August, Iron.io announced its strategic partnership with Mesosphere, enabling microservices and serverless computing for modern data centers. Joint customers using Mesosphere’s Data Center Operating System (DC/OS) with Iron.io could experience enhanced flexibility to develop their hybrid cloud strategy and run distributed job processing across heterogeneous environments.

Yesterday, we added an announcement that serverless functionality is now available on Cloud Foundry and Iron.io supports Diego as a runtime for Iron.io workloads. Iron.io is now able to be deployed on top of Cloud Foundry, run inside of Cloud Foundry, and scale out Cloud Foundry containers.

Wow. I was here for all of it and it still seems like a lot, but it’s only the beginning. The Iron.io team is committed to bringing a serverless experiences to developers and companies far and wide.

If you want information on how we define serverless and why the world is moving this way, check out Chad Arimura’s presentation Best Practices for Implementing Serverless Architecture from the O’Reilly Software Architect conference or Dave Nugent and Ivan Dywer’s great Fireside Chat about serverless computing.

Cloud Foundry and Iron.io Deliver Serverless

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This week, the Cloud Foundry Summit is happening in Frankfurt. If you are there, give us a shout. The Iron.io team is there and would love to meet with you. It looks to be a great conference.

We at Iron.io have been fortunate to have been a member of the Cloud Foundry Foundation for several years. It’s focus on high scalability, auto-scaling, and multicloud support matches what Iron.io delivers to its customers.

Today, Cloud Foundry and Iron.io took this commitment to a new level with the announcement that we are working together to bring a true multicloud serverless experience to the thousands of enterprises using Cloud Foundry. Companies can now offer their developers serverless functionality. That means developers can run code without provisioning or managing servers across multiple clouds. This is a key requirement for enterprises that maintain specific data types in an on-premises or private cloud environment.

Iron.io also announced its support for Diego as a runtime for Iron.io workloads; Iron.io is now able to be deployed on top of Cloud Foundry, run inside of Cloud Foundry, and scale out Cloud Foundry containers.

If you want to schedule a meeting at this week’s Cloud Foundry Summit in Frankfurt, or schedule a chat with those of us holding down the fort in the office, fill out this Contact Us form and we’ll get a meeting/call set up.

Intel: Accelerating Enterprise Innovation with Iron.io

Screen Shot 2016-04-07 at 1.52.05 PMIntel launched the OpenStack Innovation Center to build new pools of developers who write applications that run on enterprise clouds, and who understand that as they write the code for these clouds, it’s based on best practices of operational experience.

Intel is also working with Mirantis, Rackspace and CoreOS to make OpenStack more enterprise-ready.

Cloud Application Architecture

When application architects understand what’s happening at the infrastructure level, they want to be able to affect those decisions to improve performance. If I see that a workload is affecting another workload, or a high-priority workload (such as payroll,) I need to make sure that my applications get access to the resources they need. Intel’s Resource Director has the ability to tie the RDT features up through the layers in the infrastructure stack so it can benefit the application. Workloads can also be placed to take advantage of specific performance gains offered by certain servers, such as those offering an expanded CPU instruction set.

Intelligent Enterprise Data Centers: SNAP

How can enterprise customers use these features? Intel has been working on these features sets for years, providing visibility into into their platform. SNAP is an Intel-authored open source telemetry framework that provides detail about what’s happening on their platform into the hands of developers, so that those developers can do something with it.

Visibility is key to better decision-making in the data center.

One of the key things our team thought about when launching SNAP is that agents are difficult to operationalize because they have to be maintained individually. We asked, how can we reduce the operational burden of telemetry to zero?

Intel + Iron.io: Event-driven Job Processing for Anyone’s Data Center

Iron.io is leveraging SNAP as the way to understand the landscape of the data center, to better land workers on hardware that provides the most advantageous instruction sets, from crypto to FPGA to a vector instruction set accelerator.

Introducing Lambda support on Iron.io

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Serverless computing has become a compelling model for companies to add business value without their development teams having to worry about provisioning, managing and scaling infrastructure. The concept is that developers write code that performs business logic based on  some specific input data, and the platform handles the details of:

  • Where to run it: Use some machine with available capacity in its pool
  • When to run it: Either event-driven or scheduled
  • How to run it: Decouple your developers from your runtime. You do not have to be concerned about whether your program is running on bare metal, in a VM or in some sort of container

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Why Iron.io Joined the Cloud Foundry Foundation

As of today, Iron.io formally joined the Cloud Foundry Foundation, the community behind the rapidly growing open source Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS). With this exciting news, I wanted to take a quick moment to reflect on what brought us here, and where we see ourselves moving towards.

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Iron.io Now Available in Microsoft Azure Marketplace

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Iron.io continues to grow its ecosystem of value-added partners. To this point, today you can now find Iron.io solutions in the Application Services within the Microsoft Azure Marketplace. Azure users can now directly leverage Iron.io within their applications to respond to application events, decouple components as independent services, offload individual workloads, and schedule regular occurring jobs.

IronWorker and IronMQ can be added by visiting the Azure Marketplace. Developers can then write and package task code for deployment to IronWorker’s processing environment within Azure. The Iron.io dashboard built into Azure provides detailed insight into the state of tasks for monitoring complete application activity and performance.

By using Azure and Iron.io, developers and operators can move individual components to the cloud, while maintaining safe application environments through improved security. Iron.io can also act as a key processing gateway to Azure component services including storage, queues, mobile services, and more, making it easy to create hybrid solutions of existing client-server applications and cloud-based microservices.

To quote Iron.io CEO Chad Arimura: “The combination of Azure and Iron.io brings flexibility, scalability, control and security – all the things Enterprises are seeking for their applications.

IronWorker and IronMQ are currently available in the West US region of Azure, and support multiple languages with native SDKs including Go, Java, Ruby, PHP, Python, Node.js, and .NET.

Treasure Data and IronWorker (repost)

Our friends at Treasure Data wrote a blog post about data collection in Ruby and how to run multiple data collection tasks in parallel (or scheduled) using IronWorker. The example from Treasure Data demonstrates what it takes to build a simple logging application in Ruby with IronWorker to manage and log the output to Treasure Data, which can then perform queries.

As noted in the blog, this example is not a complete solution but an illustration to show users what’s possible when combining Iron.io and Treasure Data. Big thanks to John Hammink and the Treasure Data team for their work to educate the community.

Here’s an excerpt from the original post:

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How Omaze Delivers Once in a Lifetime Experiences Using Iron.io and Rackspace DevOps

Blow Sh*t Up with Arnold Schwarzenegger … Be Drawn Into an Episode of the Simpsons … Celebrate the Patriots Victory with Rob Gronkowski.

These aren’t even bucket list items, these are unattainable items. That is, until Omaze gets involved. Omaze is an organization that was founded to drive significantly more money and awareness for deserving causes through the chance to live out dream experiences.

Charities offer up personalized events with their celebrity partners where everyone has the chance to win by donating to the cause. Each experience offers a range of reward levels from signed t-shirts to personalized Skype sessions to Twitter mentions, and once the experience is placed up on the Omaze site, the countdown begins to the winner of the grand prize. The growing number of high profile celebrities participating to provide such unique opportunities begs the question – what’s your dream experience?

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Iron.io Launches IronWorker within the Azure Marketplace

Iron.io is pleased to announce it is offering its IronWorker platform as an Application Service within the Azure Marketplace, providing a key infrastructure component that gives developers immediate access to highly scalable event-driven computing services.

Every application in the cloud needs to process workloads on a continuous basis, at scale, on a schedule, or in the background. IronWorker is a modern application development platform for processing at a task level by isolating code packages and dependencies in a containerized compute environment managed by Iron.io.

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How to Build an ETL Pipeline for ElasticSearch Using Segment and Iron.io

ETL is a common pattern in the big data world for collecting and consolidating data for storage and/or analysis. Here’s the basic process:

  • Extract data from a variety of sources
  • Transform data through a set of custom processes
  • Load data to external databases or data warehouses

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