Announcing IronFunctions Open Source

logo-black-400wToday we’re excited to announce IronFunctions, our first major open source project.

IronFunctions is a serverless microservices platform that you can run anywhere; on public, private, and hybrid clouds, even on your own laptop. The world is moving towards hybrid/multi-cloud, so should your serverless platform.

It runs on top of the popular orchestration frameworks (Kubernetes, Mesosphere), inside PaaS runtime environments (CloudFoundry, OpenShift), and on bare metal.

Functions are packaged using Docker so it supports any language, any dependencies, and can run anywhere. It will also eventually support other container technologies, and today it supports the Lambda function format for easy portability and will soon support others as well.

IronFunctions is written in Go, extremely fast, and written with scalability and operability in mind.

Finally, it’s being driven by our team at Iron.io that is unashamedly taking credit for coining the term serverless dating back to 2011 and 2012. We’ve launched billions of containers through our flagship serverless job processing service IronWorker, and now bring this knowledge and experience to IronFunctions to round out our portfolio of products with synchronous capabilities.

So without further ado, we’d love your help in building an amazing platform and community. Fork the repo and please give us pull requests and create issues!

The Project: https://github.com/iron-io/functions

Join our Slack room: http://get.iron.io/open-slack

The Press Release: http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/ironio-releases-first-open-source-project-2175887.htm

Join the conversation: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=12961296

Thanks for supporting Iron.io for the past 5+ years.

Chad Arimura
CEO, Iron.io

Delivering on the Promise of Multicloud Lambda-like Functionality

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In February, we launch a beta called Project Kratos. It promised to bring Lambda-like functionality to any cloud – public, private, hybrid or on-premises. As we quickly approach Q4, February seems like a long time ago, but so much has happened since then.

Over the past seven months, serverless computing has gained momentum as more than just the hot topic of the moment. Because it allows enterprises to build and deploy applications and services at scale on flexible platforms that abstract away physical infrastructure, it’s quickly becoming a must have for the modern enterprise. It will soon be a competitive advantage for those already implementing it.

Our journey with serverless has also moved from a project announcement full of promises to the solution that is widely available today.  First, in April, we announced the general availability of its multicloud solution. Since then, we’ve systematically partnered with leading cloud providers to support multicloud development.

In April, Iron.io announced its partnership with Mirantis to bring event-driven, serverless functionality to the OpenStack community. The joint solution enables enterprise developers using OpenStack to deliver applications and services faster through the serverless experience provided by Iron.io.

In May, Iron.io announced its collaboration with Cloud Foundry Foundation, home of the industry-standard multi-cloud platform, to integrate the Iron.io API with the Cloud Foundry platform.

In June, Iron.io brought the serverless experience to Red Hat OpenShift — a pairing that provided users with an end-to-end environment for building and deploying applications at scale, without the headaches of complex operations.

And in August, Iron.io announced its strategic partnership with Mesosphere, enabling microservices and serverless computing for modern data centers. Joint customers using Mesosphere’s Data Center Operating System (DC/OS) with Iron.io could experience enhanced flexibility to develop their hybrid cloud strategy and run distributed job processing across heterogeneous environments.

Yesterday, we added an announcement that serverless functionality is now available on Cloud Foundry and Iron.io supports Diego as a runtime for Iron.io workloads. Iron.io is now able to be deployed on top of Cloud Foundry, run inside of Cloud Foundry, and scale out Cloud Foundry containers.

Wow. I was here for all of it and it still seems like a lot, but it’s only the beginning. The Iron.io team is committed to bringing a serverless experiences to developers and companies far and wide.

If you want information on how we define serverless and why the world is moving this way, check out Chad Arimura’s presentation Best Practices for Implementing Serverless Architecture from the O’Reilly Software Architect conference or Dave Nugent and Ivan Dywer’s great Fireside Chat about serverless computing.

Cloud Foundry and Iron.io Deliver Serverless

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This week, the Cloud Foundry Summit is happening in Frankfurt. If you are there, give us a shout. The Iron.io team is there and would love to meet with you. It looks to be a great conference.

We at Iron.io have been fortunate to have been a member of the Cloud Foundry Foundation for several years. It’s focus on high scalability, auto-scaling, and multicloud support matches what Iron.io delivers to its customers.

Today, Cloud Foundry and Iron.io took this commitment to a new level with the announcement that we are working together to bring a true multicloud serverless experience to the thousands of enterprises using Cloud Foundry. Companies can now offer their developers serverless functionality. That means developers can run code without provisioning or managing servers across multiple clouds. This is a key requirement for enterprises that maintain specific data types in an on-premises or private cloud environment.

Iron.io also announced its support for Diego as a runtime for Iron.io workloads; Iron.io is now able to be deployed on top of Cloud Foundry, run inside of Cloud Foundry, and scale out Cloud Foundry containers.

If you want to schedule a meeting at this week’s Cloud Foundry Summit in Frankfurt, or schedule a chat with those of us holding down the fort in the office, fill out this Contact Us form and we’ll get a meeting/call set up.

Iron.io and Mesosphere’s strategic partnership enables microservices and serverless computing for modern data centers

Iron_Mesos_ALots of people have been asking about how they can use Mesosphere and Iron.io together. It makes sense, because Iron.io’s workload processing engine and hybrid microservices architecture are perfectly suited to take advantage of Mesosphere’s Datacenter Operating System (DC/OS), the first open and comprehensive platform for building, running and scaling modern enterprise applications.

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Navigating the Cloud Foundry Ecosystem of Ecosystems: An ISV Perspective

By Cloud Foundry

Even Neil Degrasse Tyson would be impressed with how quickly and effectively the Cloud Foundry community has evolved into a fully organic ecosystem of ecosystems. This is because forward thinking organizations are putting a stake in the ground that Cloud Foundry will be the foundation for all future software development and deployment. In this multi-cloud platform-centric world, where do the ISVs fit?

As a relatively new member of the Cloud Foundry Foundation, Iron.io has first hand experience how to communicate, collaborate, and contribute with the members of the community to extend the platform where applicable and satisfy customer needs when requested. They key is knowing what you bring to the table, and doing it the cloud native way.

In this session, Ivan Dwyer shares a few anecdotes from Iron.io’s experiences working with Cloud Foundry community partners across integration engineering, co-marketing, and joint sales efforts – what’s worked, what hasn’t, and what’s coming next.

OpenShift Ecosystem: Iron.io Brings a Serverless Experience to OpenShift

There has been a lot of buzz around the Serverless trend lately; what it really means and what are its merits. At the end of the day it’s really just a new way to treat certain workloads – background jobs. How does this new pattern fit in the context of developing cloud native applications and operating container platforms such as Red Hat OpenShift?

LAYING THE FOUNDATION

Delivering continuous innovation to customers often leads to continuous pressure on the developers to build and ship software… well, continuously. Smart companies are doing all they can to empower their development teams with the right culture to encourage productivity, and the right tools to make it happen. Emerging as the foundational layer for many organizations’ application development efforts is a container application platform, with OpenShift as a leading choice.

As infrastructure resources continue to be commoditized, and as services continue to be exposed as APIs, having a foundational layer is critical to bring everything together. This is especially important when dealing with multiple distributed applications and multiple distributed teams, as containerized applications, workloads, and services need a unifying environment. (more…)

Massive Content, Validation & Serverless: Cloud Expo 2016 Recap

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The Cloud Expo was held June 7-9, 2016 in New York City, and Iron.io sent a team to present our vision for the future, collaborate with other attendees and answer questions. Below is a summary of three technical sessions representative of the Containers track at the conference:

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Buzzwords: Microservices, Containers and Serverless at Goto Chicago

Goto Chicago Dave Speaking

It was an honor to give a talk on the future of Serverless at goto Chicago, an enterprise developer conference running from May 24 to 25, 2016. As you can see from the full room, containers, microservices and serverless are popular topics with developers, and this interest extends across a wide swath of back-end languages, from Java to Ruby to node.js. Unfortunately, the talk was not recorded, so I’m providing these notes (and my slide deck) for those who could not attend.

The Evolution of Deployed Applications

Before we look forward into the future of Serverless, let’s look back. We’ve seen a historical evolution in deployed applications at multiple different levels. Whereas before the unit of scale was measured by how many servers you could deploy, we’ve moved through rolling out virtual machines to the current pattern of scaling our containerized infrastructure. Similarly, we’ve seen a shift from monolithic architectures deployed through major releases to containerized, continuously-updated microservices. This paradigm is Iron.io’s “sweet spot,” and we’re leading the enterprise towards a serverless computing world.

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Iron.io named an IDC Innovator in PaaS

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Being Innovative and enabling developers to innovate are driving forces for Iron.io. It’s what we do. Having said that, it’s very nice when we receive outside recognition. When the recognition is part of a well thought out analysis from IDC, it is fantastic. I’m happy to report that, Iron.io was named an IDC Innovator in the just released IDC Innovators: Platform as a Service, 2016 report (doc #US41166516, May 2016).

The report spotlights emerging vendors with revenue under $50 million that offer an innovative new technology, a groundbreaking approach to an existing issue and/or an interesting new business model. Iron.io is among five companies named in the eight-page report by Larry Carvalho, IDC research manager in the Platform as a Service (PaaS) area. (more…)

Four and a Half Years of Go in Production at goto Chicago 2016

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Travis Reeder, CTO and co-founder of Iron.io, gave a talk at Goto Chicago 2016 discussing Iron.io’s early migration to Go, why we changed our infrastructure and the benefits it has brought to us.

One of the questions that always comes up after telling people we migrated to Go is:

“Why not Ruby?”

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